Tag Archives: research

The Silence and The Step Back

31 Jan

Although I didn’t fall into a hole and hide from the world, the three months silence from here was probably a manifestation of my work taking so many directions and my confidence taking so many tumbleturns. Being able to step back a little now is much less about feeling more confident and more about feeling more confident that this is exactly the process I need to go on to feel confident in the end. 

The research topic has taken new shapes, new dimensions, new forms and has, ultimately, become driven by the theory… but weirdly, it’s better BECAUSE it’s driven that way. And it’s not even particularly different but it does feel more original and more necessary. That’s got to be good, right? 

During ‘The Silence’ I learnt to step back entirely from what I expected from myself and what I expected the PhD to look like in the end. It’s a freeing moment when you realise that the joy of doing this type of research is the myriad of avenues your reading and inquiring can take you (and on a side note, the moment of joy when you realise Foucault IS relevant, IS interesting and IS comprehensible… in parts!). 

The Step Back was actually many forms of stepping upwards, backwards, downwards at the same time; up a level of theory, down into specific parts of that theory, back to historic theory; upwards in my own knowledge and understanding, backwards in expectations of myself… The list really could go on. 

By the end of next week I should have completed the rewritten, reformulated, refocussed, retheorised, repositioned (……etc!) proposal for my research, and my first chapter. I’m hoping the next silence is as I breathe and enjoy a step forward. 

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The first assault…

9 Oct

“The PhD is an assault on your confidence…” I was told this on day one by a 3rd Year Ph.D student and didn’t doubt it, though I had expected to get a few more weeks under the belt before I felt it happen. Even the supervisors said this is normal process, another student insisted I’m still further along than most at this stage. But that doesn’t help when you’re used to achieving well, used to being capable of stringing more than three words together in sentences that make sense and possibly even sometimes create some logical, convincing and coherent argument. Not today.

After a week of exploring the proposal it seems like I’m being encouraged to step further away from the topic that drives my passion for the research and step into a territory that I think will pigeonhole me in a way that I don’t want. Whether it’s because I don’t feel any kind of confidence in that area or because I don’t want to feel like I’m allowing 10 years of expertise to just dissolve, I think today is my first experience of having to “push against it”, as fellow student C said. He said he wishes he pushed against the interests of his supervisor a bit more, after all it’s OUR three or four years and OUR chance to carve out the expertise in the topics we’re passionate about.  

But then it’s not like I’m not passionate about all aspects of the topic. Is this assault on the confidence actually related to wanting to stick to what I feel comfortable with, and if I do that am I actually selling myself out and not using the opportunity to get stuck into something so that I really learn and really grow? Is the Ph.D about learning how to research, how to ground research in theory so that it can be justified and respected, or just adding to what I’ve done already?

The first assault has resulted in the task of a month of reading around a topic I enjoy but not the central topic I am desperate to not leave behind… the battle lines are bound to change but they’re looking a little scary at the moment….

The first meeting…

1 Oct

I am incredibly lucky to have two supervisors who have agreed they want to take an equal role in helping to shape my learning and the research experience. Despite this meaning twice the pressure to live up to, I class myself as lucky because they’re both influential and important in their respective fields and that and the end of the slog I’ll have had the experience of two great academics who will have pushed and pushed and probably wanted to throttle me to get the best work done.

But two supervisors makes for quite the first supervisory meeting. Gulp doesn’t quite cut it.

The first meeting is where we set the tone, the expectations, and the fear sets in. Despite one supervisor’s encouraging opening ditty (“I told other students they had to be incredibly passionate about their work and knew I didn’t have to say that to you… I’m so excited for you!”), I still felt the nerves trickle down my spine like drizzle on a drainpipe! The three of us sat around a small table, my original proposal winking from beneath a pile of forms to fill in and agendas, and got ready to set the ball rolling. Suddenly, the whole thing took on a reality that I don’t think I’d allowed myself to acknowledge.

We spent over an hour talking through the expectations they had of me and what I could expect from them. We talked about the process (and I internalised the fear!!), discussed the topic, explored my training and methodology, and agreed on next steps. Apparently, I am now a Ph.D researcher…. with a 1000 word piece of homework and a pretty huge dose of trepidation on one shoulder and excitement on the other.

The topic…

1 Oct

Passion and commitment to the topic must be central to any Ph.D, whether three, four or five years. Thankfully, I’m not short of either, though sometimes I know my passion can verge more towards over excitement and annoying exuberance!

My topic is current, political, potentially gendered, and based on my own belief in the power of education to shape and build better futures. But I have taken the difficult decision to step away from the practical, pedagogical application and take stock of all that comes before: how our understandings of the world and our place in it shapes our pedagogy and the type of education we promote.

I had arrived at the first meeting desperate to cling on to what I felt confident (*insert, comfortable) with – pedagogy and the role of the teacher. But four days around other Ph.D students must have had some kind of impact because as we discussed the purpose of any Ph.D I realised I had to cut the apron strings and step away from the comfort of pedagogy and push myself to somewhere new where other passions would have the opportunity to ignite and, hopefully, thrive.

The first week and first real discussions showed me that the Ph.D is about learning how to research, how to think and question and reflect in a whole new way, and then apply that practically. So the topic changed a little and morphed into a new shape; it has the same content and passions but has new edges, new dimensions and new opportunities. And new excitements.

The proposal

21 Sep

No, not the Sandra Bullock film, the few hundred words detailing my intended research for the next three years and the start of my journey to doctordom. The start of my PhD. The road to somewhere, I hope.

Writing a proposal is exciting, invigorating and awful. My brain swirled in a foggy mist of everything I found interesting but couldn’t include, everything I felt passionate about but probably couldn’t be objective about, and everything I knew I needed to know but had dreaded the realisation of admitting I didn’t know enough about. Or something like that. But I got a title together and even managed to find some people who kind of agreed with things I wanted to say.

When outlining your research, you have to include your methodology. So far I am committed to qualitative AND quantiative methods, and a whole lot of grey literature. So most of the methods of research in the social sciences then. But the strange aspect of writing the research methodology section is that you write in the future tense… I will… this research will… through the use of… I will… I will…. Will I?